Experimental Inhalation Studies Of Fibres In Non-human Primates Exposed To Low Dose Asbestos Fibres

Experimental Inhalation Studies Of Fibres In Non-human Primates Exposed To Low Dose Asbestos Fibres.

J Murray
NIOH with collaborators from the USA
Project Summary:

Following the link between crocidolite asbestos and malignant mesothelioma made at the NIOH in 1960. The NIOH embarked on many research projects into asbestos and mesothelioma. While much is known about mesothelioma many important questions remain points of scientific debate. The mesotheliomagenicity of asbestos has been ranked crocidolite > amosite. However there is controversy surrounding the ability of chrysotile to induce mesothelioma and this association has not been reported from South Africa.

Mesotheliomas are reported from chrysotile workers in other countries and they may be due to contamination by other types of amphibole asbestos. It has been suggested that chrysotile is cleared relatively quickly from the lung, similar to glass fibres. Furthermore uncertainties remain around the dose response relationship between very low level amphibole asbestos exposures and mesotheliomas.

To investigate the adverse health effects of asbestos in detail, experiments at the NIOH were conducted using a non-human primate (NHP) model. Non-human primates, due to their similarity to humans have been widely recognized as a good model for studies of human diseases.

Contact Person:
Prof. J. Murray (jill.murray@nioh.nhls.ac.za)